Irit Ben-Chelouche

Director of Business Development, Harvard Medical School

Displaying: 21 - 30 of 36 Results

Targeting spiral ganglion neurons for treatment of hearing loss

Hearing loss makes interactions with the world challenging for over 30 million people in the United States. While cochlear implants and hearing aid devices can ameliorate hearing loss, they often fail to restore the function of spiral ganglion…

Investigators

  • Lisa Goodrich

Genomic Analysis Tool Box

Cancer genomes frequently harbor high mutation rates, complex structural variations, and are characterized by genome instability. Detailed understanding of these characteristics of the cancer genome is necessary for pinpointing the cause of tumor…

Investigators

  • Peter Park

A system for in vivo generation of protective CD8+ T lymphocytes and other cells of hematopoietic origin

Differentiated CD8+ effector T cells mediate long-term immunity and protection against infectious diseases and cancer. Naive T cells are refractory to transduction with viral vectors without extensive ex vivo manipulations. A team of researchers at…

Investigators

  • Arlene H. Sharpe
  • Nicholas Haining

Immunology and Computational Biology Partnership

Professors Diane Mathis and Christophe Benoist at Harvard Medical School, together with other world-renowned immunologists and computational biologists from multiple research institutions, have created the Immunological Genome Project – Immgen…

Investigators

  • Diane J. Mathis
  • Christophe O. Benoist

New therapeutic pathway for autoimmune and inflammatory disorders

A recently-discovered class of T cells - T follicular regulatory (TFR) cells - controls the production of antibodies. TFR cells inhibit T follicular helper (TFH) cells, which mediate antibody production in lymph nodes. Several autoimmune diseases…

Investigators

  • Arlene H. Sharpe
  • Peter Sage
  • Loise Francisco

Novel methods for generating regulatory T-cells

Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) are key mediators of peripheral tolerance that can actively suppress effector T-cells, inhibit inflammation and mediate self-tolerance. Unlike naturally occurring Tregs (nTregs) which develop in the thymus,…

Investigators

  • Arlene H. Sharpe
  • Loise Francisco
  • Vijay K. Kuchroo

A system for the continuous directed evolution of biomolecules

Researchers in the laboratory of Professor David Liu have developed a platform that enables the continuous directed evolution of gene-encoded molecules that can be linked to protein production in E. coli. During phage-assisted continuous evolution…

Investigators

  • David R. Liu
  • Kevin M. Esvelt
  • Jacob Carlson
  • Ahmed Hussein Badran

Directed evolution of proteins and nucleic acids using nonhomologous random recombination

The nonhomologous random recombination (NRR) method allows portions of nucleic acids to be recombined at sites where there is little or no sequence homology. This increases the frequency at which novel sequences are generated, allowing a more…

Investigators

  • David R. Liu
  • Joshua Bittker

Drug-inducible RNA aptaswitch for regulating eukaryotic protein expression

Using in vivo evolution techniques, scientists in the Liu laboratory have engineered a drug-inducible aptaswitch for regulating eukaryotic protein expression at the transcription level. This aptaswitch consists of two modular RNA elements: a…

Investigators

  • David R. Liu
  • Allen R. Buskirk
  • Polina Kehayova

Small-molecule-triggered intein splicing as a universal switch for protein activation

Researchers in the laboratory of Professor David Liu have used directed evolution techniques to evolve an intein-based molecular switch that transduces binding of a small molecule into the activation of an arbitrary protein of interest. To create…

Investigators

  • David R. Liu
  • Allen R. Buskirk
  • Sun H. Peck

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